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in print. one of the documentaries we did was in india. it was a very interesting story that we are going to go with that had to do with a group of women in a little village who had organized themselves and built a road to their village. these were women who had taught themselves how to do this work, and then confronted the men and ended up getting the men to pay them for the work. we decided that was a story we cannot do on radio, because no one spoke english. we did all the interviews the translation and reviewed all the tapes and said we just cannot put this on air, because people will be listening to half an hour of language they do not understand. >> how have you found your time being spent, now that you do this plus your column? >> audio and radio work is very time-consuming. there are lots of things to pull together. probably the last year i have spent more time doing audio work than anything else. this year i suspect i will flip a little bit and devote more time to print. i am about to start working on a new book as well. >> what is it about? >> i wrote a book close to 15 years ag
. they looked at the impact of floods in countries like india and parts of asia, what it would have on neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as our most important life support system and the vehicle through which we'll feel the impacts of climate change whether it's drought, desertification, seasonality of rivers, where before they ran year-round, all of that is going to change the world as we know it. host: we will get to viewer phone calls in a moment. i want to give folks a look at some of what blue august is about on planet green this month. here's a look. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cen
-- question was on the geography between pakistan and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart w
, israel, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of approximate a series of differen iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candid
. it will have a big impact on our economy and our jobs. i call this the full employment act for india and china. what we are going to do if we pass this bill, and by the way, we talk about what the greatest threat to freedom is this is that the health care bill or the capt. trade bill? they are both huge threat, but i think the capt. trade is even more -- i think the cap and the trade is even more dangerous. you'll know that it will haven't -- not have an impact on global climate change because factories and plants and facilities in so many of the things of our manufactured in our industrial sector will move from the united states and will move to china and will move to india and indonesia and it is interesting because i follow these global climate packs and when you go to these things, there is only one thing the rest of the world can agree on. they want the united states to go first. they want us to drop off the close first. that is why the day that the u.s. house of representatives passed that capt. trade bill -- that c and trade bill, they had parades' in the streets in india. i hope that n
and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart who i keep fully informed in india. >>
, india and pakistan, they are not bound by the treaty, but iran is. iran violated that treaty in approximate a series of different respects and iran has been sanctioned by the united nations for those violations. the sanctions are too weak to cause a change in iran's behavior, but at least it it demonstrates iran has violated the treaty responsibilities. the fact is that while iran has the right to develop electricity from nuclear power plants, they are flaring their natural gas they could generate electricity for a couple kilo watt. >> host: why are they? >> guest: they have no way to export it, liquiified natural gas plant to markets. >> host: back to afghanistan, full page, photograph for afghans, a new test of democracy, their presidential election. their elections are coming up in 10 days, i believe august 20th. what are your hopes for the election? >> guest: a fair and free election would be outstanding step toward building afghanistan as a state. i can't tell you that i'd vote for this candidate or that can d candidate? >> host: is karz ai the best candidate to hav
. on his visit to india in 2006, david cameron said he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also leading member of the commonwealth, an organization which has been neglected and undervalued under the labour government in britain. in last year's strategy documents, the only mention of the commonwealth was in the title. it is extraordinary -- it is the unique network of 53 country spanning five continents with 35 of the world's population -- 3 favre% of the world's population. -- 35% of the world's population. a good example of how it could be used is to encourage to take a leading role in addressing state failure, like coordinating a future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. if the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where rican recreate historic connections on a new, modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many of the countries of the middle east and gulf, not o
unnecessary. on top of that, the huge expansion of economy such as china and india means that in our working lifetimes, the size of the european economy relative to address the world looks set to shrink dramatically. projections have shown europe's share of the world economy declining from 18% to 10% by the middle of the century, and even the united states is not immune from the effect of economic problems. this diminished economic weight will have a major impact on the ability of western nations to achieve their foreign policy goals. we are used to the idea of calling for economic sanctions against nations whose human rights records we find an acceptable. south africa under apartheid being a celebrated example. now we apply them to recalcitrant and regimes. it is already clear that the power of such economic weapons is declining. it follows from this analysis that it will decline much further in the years to come. what is more, much of the economic weight in the world is passing the countries which either do not fully share our concepts of democracy and human rights or for their own reasons
to pass a resolution in the u.n. council on human-rights. india, another rising power and the world's most populous democracy, is traditionally not inclined to support our western inclination to support human rights and economic pressure and military intervention. nor are many of the growing economic power centers in the world, brazil or in the call. not only has the world not converting around our own democratic norms, but according to a survey, global freedom to his third year of decline in 2008, but nearly powerful democratic nations do not share our view of how to conduct foreign policy. the liberal interventionism has generated much debate in britain. but the varying degrees, all have subscribed to it. the economic conditions have enjoyed some support as has military intervention in many countries. iraq being a much more controversial case, but heavily supported at the time. we're all agreed that we would try to intervene in another situation. but in the years and decades to come, the rise of other nations will constrain our ability to act in this way. a further constraint will come i
medicine. last week after working for years only with the generic drug companies principally in india and south africa, we announced our first big agreement with a large pharmaceutical company, pfizer, the biggest of all, has agreed to work with us to cut the price by 60% of the only drug we know that is affected at treating tubular chlorosis with people who have had aids for a long time. in other cases, all this medicine almost makes the conditions were spread half a million people die from this disease who have aids. the interactions of the madison and the t.b. medicine is often not good. the fact that they were willing to cut the price 60% will save a couple hundred thousand lives a year within two years. that is answering the how question. we tried to do the same thing in climate change where we are working with 40 cities around the world to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by retrofitting public housing, or big public buildings, or changing the street lights, or putting in new led streetlights in los angeles, or making ports more efficient, are working on better public transportat
-- the manufacturing jobs that were in america and were moved to countries like india and china. i think that they are experiencing an industrial revolution much like what we saw in the 20th-century. i think that they are developing a middle-class while we are losing our middleclass. i also think that for an economy to do well, there has to be a strong middle-class. that is indicative when you look at consumer spending indexes. we just don't have the money. we don't have the dollars because we don't have manufacturing jobs that developed are middle-class. guest: that is exactly right. that is the essence of the book, which is that china and india have replicated the success in developing this industrialized economy. by opening of their labor force to more exploitation, it does speak to the myth of gdp. you have a growth but poverty grows at the same time. the loss of manufacturing jobs is really such a central element to both this recession and the declining living standards in terms of the exploitation of people, but declining marriage rates, unraveling of our society and many other cou
visit to india in 2006, david cameron said that he believed it was time for britain and india to forge a new special relationship, focusing particularly on fighting terrorism, protecting the environment, and globalization. india is also a leading member of the commonwealth, which has been valued on to the labour -- which as been devalued in the labour gouvernment. it is extraordinary diversity offers some straight, a unique network of 53 countries spanning five continents with 30% of the world's population. we believe the commonwealth is a tool to be picked up and used more often, to help dialogue and conflict prevention, taking a leading role in addressing state failure by coordinating up future rehabilitation package for its former member, zimbabwe. get the commonwealth is not the only group of countries where we can recreate historic connections on a new modern basis. i have long argued that britain should embark on the elevation of its links with many countries of the middle east in the gulf. not only diplomatically, but in matters of culture, education, commerce, and security. thi
. we will start right on time. the ambassador from india is here. [laughter] [applause] but councilman jack evans is here. [applause] we have representatives from different embassies, as well. let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. christina romer. as many of you may know, she is the chair of the council of economic advisers. that position was established by the employment act of 1946 where it was decided that the president of united states needed independent, objective economic analysis and advice. from the time that the council was greeted the late 40's, it has had some of the most distinguished economists serving in that position. it has had a long history of very distinguished economists and dr. romer is within the tradition. she is what the best known economists in the country and one of the best known macro economist in the country. she served for 20 years as a member of the faculty of the university of california, berkeley. in that position, she became an expert on the depression, the causes and consequences, and how the u.s. government responded. she ca
they looked at the impact of a flood in countries like india and and parts of asia, and neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as are most of will and life support system and the vehicle through which we will feel the impact of climate change, weather drought or desertification, floods, rising sea levels, melting glaciers, seasonality of rivers creag before they ran year round. all of that is absolutely going to change the world as we know it. host: with we'll get to your phone calls. we have folks waiting. i did want to give folks a look at what's blue august is about. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cent
and could provide for her family, a single mother. her job is now in india. those x-rays are emailed every night to india, and all those ladies who did that job are out of work. my grandmother in tyler, texas, this week we had a meeting of the family. she had a stroke and has been in intensive care in a long-term nursing facility. her medicare will not pay for her to be there anymore unless we put her in long term. she has to switch over to medicaid. my mother and her two brothers had to figure out, can we afford to have a nurse come to the home so my grandmother can pass away with dignity, or do we have to leave her in a nursing home and hope medicaid can pick up. this is not feel sorry for chuck rocha. everybody in this hall can tell that same story at some level. my family is not the only one having that meeting. their families all over the country having that meeting, and we need health care reform now. [applause] it is up to us, the people in this room. you have the power, just like the unions had the power and young people in this country have the power. we do have the backbone. we d
in december. there are international negotiations. i do not know how to get china and india to come along. if they will go along with it and we will not lose all and we will not lose all manufacturers to china understand, china is the number one and matter of this pollution. not the united states. india is even more adamant about not doing anything. then, we lose our jobs. we want to get china under the umbrella. number two, it takes the 2/3 vote in the united states senate to get it done. there is some protection for our industry and some protection for our consumers if we do it through international treaty. >> glad to see you again today. i am a veteran. i am very proud to be a veteran. [applause] i belong to the american legion. in order for a person to be called a veteran that has to serve in the military, there are lots of people that are called veterans that cannot belong to the american legion. congress after world war roman one set up the american legion. is the largest veterans' organization in the world. we have a lot of people. in order to belong to the american legion, you had
wonder because they are on the other side of pakistan. it would be a good strategic movement if india made the move towards bin laden, if he is still alive. another question, perhaps we are already monitoring bin laden? perhaps our intelligence has him on the phone all the time? could that be possible? guest: i wish it were, but it would speak to some kind of nefarious plot. if he were on the phone and we have not killed him. if we are listening to him on the phone we can geo-locate him and he would be yesterday's news. so, i seriously doubt we're listening to him. secondly, part of the problem we have in afghanistan is we have already allowed a large indian presence, both economically, and they are doing a lot of construction with people dressed as civilians but who are really military engineers. people in the u.s. do not realize the degree of paranoia between two nuclear-armed countries, pakistan and india. to allow an indian military forces into pakistan would turn the pakistan knees entirely away from us. -- the pakistanis away from us. it is interesting as an idea, but in the lon
and india, you have to have a strategy for economic growth and development in a periodic and serious challenges. our argument is that we want that build a safe and prosperous future, we need to create the most productive, most creative, must entrepreneurialism, pro- market economy that runs on smart an effective economic regulation. let me be clear. i believe that if you set out and say what would maximize the number of law entrepreneurs in america, there are ways to do that. what would maximize the number of businesses created by small businesses, there are ways to do that. if you said, how can i have the most continuous process of innovation, we know how to do that. it just does not fit the political elite definition of the future, which is high tax, big bureaucracy, and politician- centered. long term, we won the budgetary reform legislation. more than a dozen bills introduced to establish entitlement and budget commission's, but it all the legislation did was have the same all conversation with in the same old frameworks, you impact would not achieve very much. you end up with an
not expect is a person who is not literate coming from india and trying to do medical, but you expect someone to a college in india that they can't afford to treat and being able to buy a ticket. that would be more of a phenomenon against the most educated -- i amongst the most educated. that would be another example. there are about 400,000 births comprising about one out of every 10 births in the u.s.. what percentage of people who are women, who arrived pregnant? -- what percentage of people or women who arrived pregnant? it is hard to get a handle on how big that is potentially. as robert pointed out, if you do not verify, which is what this new bill considers, that could grow much larger. >> i would consider the precedents for medical tourism to be quite strong indeed. in the 1980's and 1990's, we allowed elderly immigrants to come and then get on your program called supplemental security income. in fact, elderly immigrants coming to the u.s. to retire on this welfare program, it was the fastest growing element in u.s. welfare. it was absolutely unprecedented. what we found, and we had t
%. there will be a mass exodus of our manufacturing in this nation. they can go to india and china and have lower wages, lower costs. what is going to keep them here. >> you have raised to a very important questions. -- two very important questions. on cap and trade, the house of representatives have passed a bill that has a lot of problems. we have not gotten a bill in the senate. we understand the kinds of concerns you have raised. we're going to take them up and see to it that we do not have the consequences of exporting jobs or imposing a great tax. you raise a question of employee choice. that bill is in the process of being negotiated. there will not be a time line which will be so fast that people will not have an opportunity to understand what the issue is. you comment about the secret ballot, and i think we have to maintain a secret ballot, which you agree with. we're trying to work through the other facets of it on arbitration, but bearing in mind the concerns and worries that you have raised. no. 24. who has 24? yes, sir? don shapiro in 1997, i was diagnosed with a thyroid condition that put
, after working for years only with the generic drug -- a drug companies in india and south africa, we announced our first agreement with a large pharmaceutical company, pfizer who have agreed to work well us to cut the price by 60% of the only drug we know that is effective in treating tuberculosis in people who have had aids for a long time. in other cases, all this medicine almost makes the conditions worse. half a million people a real died of tuberculosis who have aids. the interactions of the madison and the tb medicine are disastrous, especially if they have advanced cases. the fact that they were willing to come with me and cut the price of this 60% will save a couple of thousand -- a couple of hundred thousand lives a year in a few years. that answers how much money you do or don't have and make it go as far as possible. we tried to do the same thing in climate change where we are working with 40 cities around the world to produce greenhouse gas -- -- to reduce greenhouse gas emissions or changing the street lights or putting in led street lights in los angeles or making the p
and japan or india talk to these two guys and ask them questions. i thought it was a perfect setup for senator kennedy. he was an experienced politician. it would be no contest. i persuaded senator kennedy to except and they did and it was carnage. nobody wanted to be more decisive than reagan did that evening. senator kennedy looked at the monitor in the room rather than the interviewer and the result is that the people watching saw him being kind of shifty i'eyed. he was trying to be very precise about vietnam. whereas one oregon was superb and he gave wonderful, reassuring pro-american answers. for years after that, whenever we would have a discussion on the kennedy staff, i would take a position and he would turn to me and say "you're the fellow that got me in that debate with ronald reagan, archer? are you? " >> [unintelligible] the former aide to ronald reagan wrote -- >> that is about right. since i was running for the legislature in california. >> how much of this french ship exists today -- a french ship exists today? -- freniendship exists today? >> he was probably involv
if we don't have an energy policy. china and india are pressed to take the rest of our jobs. their energy policy will hand them to them. because we won't compete. available, affordable energy. it's the mother's milk of the future of our country. and if we don't have a vibrant country we will never have the resources to pay down the debt. if we don't drill, opec will. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please welcome to the stage national blogger with hot air.com ed forcey. ♪ ♪ >> good morning. i hope you're enjoying a great lineup here for americans for prosperity foundation. what a great conference. absolutely. so i'm thinking to myself, americans for prosperity. i don't know, some of you may remember a time when that would have been considered a redundsy. americans for prosperity. it's like saying swimmers for getting wet weather. america was built for prosperity. this is the thing that people don't remember, a lot of people don't think about. some people just flat out deny. america was built for prosperity. people will tell you that american prosperity was an acciden
considering countries in the region like pakistan or india or russia or china? >> the commander -- this is a commander's review of his area of responsibility, which is limited to afghanistan. that is what this assessment is on. it is an assessment of the situation on the ground as general mcchrystal and his team see it. >> we're looking at additional more troops -- >> i am laughing at the hammering and drilling. >> president karzai was saying they might need additional resources. >> if it is determined by the commander that he needs additional resources to complete his mission, that request will be made to the normal chain of command. it will go up through cencom, be validated along the way, and the secretary will make a determination whether or not he recommends to the president additional troops. . . . ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ >> is a secretary in touch with countries like india for additional resources? >> i don't know of any communication with india. if he is satisfied with the progress, and i don't think anybody is satisfied with progress, i think wh
to expand its capability to strike land targets. that is a potential threat to india, according to senior administration and congressional officials. meanwhile, there is a related store this morning on the front page of "the washington post," with this headline -- the u.s. says metrics to assess or success. -- war success. back to your calls come stan from oklahoma, is this the scary season for obama? caller: yes, it is. i think there is much to begin. as much as i was impressed with the personal tributes to senator kennedy yesterday from his family, particularly, i think there is something unseemly about the emphasis on health care bill. i know that he passionately wants to get something approved, but there is much work to be done. we cannot ignore the fact that the majority of american people do not approve of the health plan as it is now. host: let me read you something based on the republican radio address from a mike enzi. this is in both the washington post and the new york times. a republican member of the senate's gang of six healthcare negotiators sharply criticized democratic su
american jobs here, create jobs for americans. i called one time to the help lines and i was calling india. i want to talk to an american. we could use that money to lower the deficit here. that is about all i have to say. host: one of the headlines this morning is in the front page of "the washington post." ben bernanke to be reappointed as the fed chairman. we will hear from the president in about 35 minutes live from martha's vineyard, the renomination. senate confirmation hearing the fall. the reappointment would take effect in january of next year. we have and we will continue to be covering these town hall meetings here on this network all this week. we will show you a cross section of democrats and republicans as they meet with their constituents. one of the hearings will be live tonight in northern virginia, a town hall meeting from the reston, va., with congressman jim moran. joining him will be former chairman of national democratic committee, former dr. and governor of vermont, howard dean. a writer for the fairfax county * will be at the town hall meeting and also with freshman
from mexico. the future of america is in jeopardy. we do not have an energy policy. china and india are pressed to take the rest of our jobs. their energy policies will handle this because we will not compete. available, affordable, energy. that is the future of this country. we will never have the resources to pay down the debt if we do not have a piper economy. but we do not grill, -- drill, opec will. >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome national logger -- blogger. >> good morning. i hope you are enjoying a great lineup. what a great conference we are having, right? absolutely. i am thinking to myself, americans for prosperity some of you may remember a time when that would have been considered a redundancy, americans for prosperity. that is like say slimmers for getting wet. -- saying swimmers for guessing what. america was built for prosperity. american prosperity was an accident of history and geography. we did happen to land on a continent with a lot of natural resources. you just have to know how to use them. we happen to build a mighty arsenal of the market sea around the world
. host: hobart, indiana. george on the india line. caller: good morning, gentlemen. glad you took my call. i just don't understand for one thing, mr. pappas. how come there is no flexibility between the parties when i have -- my wife and i have two insurance companies, employer insurance companies and we are consumed almost virtually 20% of our gross income, we are not talking about shared costs. or pharmaceutical or anything catastrophic that would happen to us. we are still going to be placed into bankruptcy. why isn't there some sort of consideration? why can't the two chambers of the house come to some sort of compromise to where we are put in a sunset or triggering mechanism to where we could try this new system of universal healthcare coverage? i don't want to use socialism because it is such a key word, a buzzword for a lot of medicaid and medicare people. they think that they are not part of the socialist medicine group. guest: what george just shared with us, i think, is very important and it reminds me of my parents' own situation. my parents live in massachusetts where they ha
and ronald reagan the new governor of california and maybe have students from england, japan, india talk to these two guys and ask them questions and have a debate. what do you think? what i thought was a perfect set from senator kennedy. he was after all, a pretty experienced politician as governor of california. exclass pse&b movie star and th accepted and they had the debate and it was carnage. no one has ever won more decisively than reagan did that evening. senator kennedy looked at the monitor in the room rather than at the interviewer and result is that the people watching saw him being kind of shifty eyed. he went along to a great length with answers trying to be precise where as ronald reagan was superb. gave wonderful reassuring pro-american answers. and for the viewers after that, whenever we'd have a discussion in the kennedy staff or the kennedy surroundings and i would take a position i would look at senator kennedy didn't hold, he would turn to me and say, you're the one that put me in the debate with ronald reagan, aren't you? >> i first heard that story from something y
china and india refuse to do the same. i do not agree with a government takeover of health care that would force millions of americans off their current health care, drive health care costs even higher for families, ration care, restrict access to the latest cures and treatments, and put health care decisions in the hands of government bureaucrats rather than doctors and patients. but i do agree that the country is tired of partisanship infecting every debate. the country is tired of actions by a congress becoming a political battle. and so while i do not follow the hypocrisy of many of my democratic colleagues who refuse to -- refused to support justice roberts and alito because they disagreed with their judicial philosophy and now suggest that republicans not do the same. i respect and agree with the legal reasoning of my colleagues who will vote "no." but i will follow the direction of the past and my hope for the future with less polarization, less confrontation, less partisanship. my friends in the party can be assured that i will work as hard as anybody to ensure that the
-dominated, politician-defying, bureaucratically-controlled mess that has no capacity to compete with china and india in had the next generation. the decisions we make this year, next year, the year after are unbelievably important. your help this sumener making sure that everyone you know calls your congressman and your senators to tell them not to pass a giant energy tax that will crush the economy and not to pass a giant government-run health program that will crush the economy. this summer you have a chance to help change history. your help over the next year in winning the argument on your campus, winning the campus in talk radio, winning in letters to the editor, going to town hall meetings, arranging for debates on key topics, setting the stage for 2010 election, which sends a signal, we want america to get back on the right track and setting the stage for 2012 election where we end up having as with jimmy carter, ensure liberalism is a one-term experience, that is the key to being successful over the next generation. let me if i could take questions. [ applause ] >> yes, ma'am? [question ina
of the dangers of war between india and tack stan. should we have to walk away from afghanistan is cat strof yik. the american public has to be told that. because that's necessary for us to be able, that's the amount of time we are going to take. there is in the current administration. we are seeing progress bp not just war by afghan life. the judiciary system, even religion, every mosque preaches propaganda to the enemy. it is so important to put the two policies together. the focus on protecting the population and throwing back the air strike extremely important. we were at risk of losing suppose mortgage we have to give that strategy time to work. one to two year statements you'd like to pick up. coming to the point where they are going to lay down their arms. let's open to the audience for questions. >> you talked about the strategy. is it coherence, reactive, proactive, could you talk about that. i think they are pretty good with that. they are also looking to cause the international military forces to overreact there by creating civilian activities. those are things that they do on a regul
the same health care and food as boys. in india, for example, girls are less likely to be vaccinated that be boys and are take on the the hospital only when they are sicker. the girls in india from 1 to 5 years of age are 50% more likely to die than boys their age. in addition, ultra sound machines have allowed a pregnant woman to find out the sex of her own fetus and then get an abortion if it's female. the global statistics on the abuse of girls are numbing. it appears that more girls and women are now missing from the planet precisely because they are female than men were killed on the batting field in all of the wars of the 20th century. so with a new administration in power and with a female woman heading the state department, how should u.s. priorities on women's issues internationally change? guest: the secretary of state hillary clinton is doing a marvelous job of highlighting the issue of women's equality around the world. one thing that we need to do in this country is the united states senate needs to ratify the united nations women's convention, the convention on the elim
, and india, and brazil, as long as they are there, been the fta problem is marginal. and then you have done doha round, it essential to poor countries and i think american farmers and ranchers have a bad case that their industry is more restricted and limited by foreign trade and any other. but agriculture is 8% of american exports. it is not going to grow even if there is a successful doha round. i think the administration goes to the public and say that we want to push for doha just as it is, the public should say the president is a smart guy and we trust him. given that trade is a dissident and difficult issue within the democratic party, i think that if the administration is going to make a big push for trade and spend capital on it, it has to have a different agenda that will do more for america as an economy and do more for our national security goals as a nation. let me give three points from my paper that i would like to say. one is, we need to look harder at ourselves and our own policies. they are not very good. if you look at the american system, we collect $25 million of tariffs
in india. we think by using a fairly systemic framework, we can put in a system where we can change the economics so that we can make it in our best interest and our suppliers best interest to understand that it is in their best interest to keep these systems truly supplied in a secure fashion, rather than allow them to be counterfeited. one thing i would say in addition to this is that we try to take a risk management approach to this. while we are worried about the supply chain, this is a problem that is generally not a big problem for industry. the reason is, it is usually easier and less costly if you are going to attack bank of america to attack it for software of one of these traditional hacks. is much harder to do it through the supply chain attack by putting something in the computer. however, from the government's perspective, this is an extremely serious problem, because if a weapons system could be infected through a manufactured attack, you cannot detect it. you do not get rid of it when the software is there, and it is absolutely possible to put in a back door or troja
the energy race with china and india? the answer is yes. we well, we have that in america, oil reserves throughout the west that rival saudi arabia's deposits, also ail in alaska, and other states. do the authors of cap and trade want to tap into that? no, we have coal reserves that have been referred to as the saudi arabia of coal. these are in kentucky, ohio, west virginia, montana and wyoming. do the authors of cap and trade want to tap into that? no america has that and more. we have the uranium, wind, solar, bio mass and hydropower. we have it all and can develop it in a responsible way. the authors of cap and trade don't want to develop all american energy resources. they want to start the energy race with china and india two laps behind as opposed to three laps ahead. the more energy america can produce, the stronger the american economy will be. energy development creates jobs, not just green jobs, but real red, white, and blue jobs. we need to keep all the american jobs we can. we need them all, and the solution rests on our shores. thank you, madam chairman. >> thank you, sena
a contract, making sure the performance is primary and that the elements india work the plan are followed. >> thank you. i appreciate your sticking around until we got to this panel to hear from you and respond to our questions. there are probably colleagues that will want to submit questions for the record. if you could have you responses back within two weeks after you received our questions, we would appreciate that very much. i was reflecting on what we have heard from this panel and what we have heard from our first panel. i always think about what the take the weight should be for us. -- i always think about what they take away should be for us. it is important to clearly outlined the objectives of an agency. they should know that and be able to clearly outlined their objectives and what they need from a contractor. i think mr. assad talked about measuring outcomes and not process. that is a theme that several of you touched upon. i think that one of you talked about cost-benefit analysis, using clear and measurable criteria as an important point. we need clear guidelines from omb.
as a senior adviser in the state department of south asia bureau where she buys them on india- pakistan relations. she served with the cia as a political analyst on south asia. she is also a political ambassador in the early 1990's. she earned honors from the cia for her analytical work on indo- pakistani relations. speaking just before her will be in someone who has studied afghanistan since the soviet invasion of 1979. his fourth book on afghanistan, "afghanistan the graveyard of empires" will be published next year. he has testified before with house and senate committees and is a frequent visitor to the region. most recently, he was in afghanistan most -- last december. he served as a talking head on cnn, tbs, fox news, and many other media outlets. his work on afghanistan was recognized by the soviet government which awarded him the titles of "musharraf also fire of history -- boucgouis faslifier of histort." aren't second speaker was the for moline project was the former analyst at the u.s. department of state. he's also a professor emeritus at the university of thillinois. before
to other countries like india or thailand for medical tourism. >> one of the many ads ot issue of health care. americans for prosperity took a look at the canadian system. we'll watch it, come back, and get your reaction. >> i survived a brain tumor. but if i had relied on my government, i would be dead. i'm a canadian citizen. and as i got worse, my government health care system told me i had to wait six months to see a specialist. in six months i would have died. >> some patients wait a year for vital surgeries. delays that can be deadly. >> many drugs and treatments are not available because government says patients aren't worth it. >> i'm here today because i was able to travel to the u.s. where i received world class treatment. government health care isn't the answer and it sure isn't free. >> now, washington wants to bring canadian style health care to the u.s. but government should never come between your family and your doctor. learn more at patients united now.com. >> my advice to americans, as patients it's your care. don't give up your rights. >> until earlier this month, u we
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